Conference on Motility in Microbes, Molecules and Matter, 6-7 December 2021, London, England

Image credit: Esinam Dake, Loughborough University
Living systems are continually in active motion. From global scale migration down to enzymatic conformational transitions and kinetic action, living systems self-organize by moving. Moreover, motility as a response to stimuli is a key strategy by which living organisms capitalize on opportunities and combat threats. Motion is then a characteristic hallmark of biological complexity; however, it is also fundamentally physical. This has made studying motility one of the most fruitful points of collaboration between biologists and physicists, and remains an exciting frontier for both groups.This workshop aims to stimulate new collaborative partnerships between experimental biologists and computational physicists. The programme is organized jointly by the IOP Biological and Computational Physics Groups and seeks to address: Biological questions that have yet to receive sufficient attention from computational modellers; Emerging numerical approaches with potential for simulating biological motions.

More details can be found at the conference webpage:
http://mmmm2021.iopconfs.org/home

Sarah Jenkins Awarded IoP CPG Thesis Prize

This year’s 2021 IoP CPG Thesis Prize has been awarded to Sarah Jenkins, University of York. Sarah’s thesis, titled Spin Dynamics Simulations of Iridium Manganese Alloys, develops an atomistic model of IrMn. This poorly understood material is antiferromagnetic and has been used in hard disk drives for some time; however, its physics at the atomic scale has not previously been well understood due to the complexity of the material’s structure. Sarah implemented a multiscale micromagnetic model within the open-source VAMPIRE simulation package. Sarah’s thesis presents her findings on IrMn alloys in three parts: (i) its ground state magnetic structure and thermal stability, (ii) its magnitude and magnetic anisotropy (iii) the interaction (exchange bias) at the interface with a ferromagnetic layer. Her results resolve the microscopic origins of exchange bias with potential impacts in future data storage, neuromorphic computing and antiferromagnetic spintronics.

We look forward to hearing about Sarah’s work in the CPG Talks Series and reading more about Sarah’s project in the next IoP Computational Physics Group Newsletter. In the meantime, Sarah’s thesis is available online.

Javier Díaz Brañas Awarded IoP CPG Thesis Prize

This year’s 2020 IoP CPG Thesis Prize has been awarded to Javier Díaz Brañas, University of Lincoln. Javier’s thesis, titled Computer Simulations of Block Copolymer Nanocomposite Systems, implemented efficient, parallel code to simulate the interaction of nanoparticles in diblock copolymer systems by developing a hybrid-technique based on Cell Dynamic Simulations for the polymers and Brownian Dynamics for the particles. Block copolymer melts can themselves self-assemble into mesoscale soft matter structures, thanks to the connectivity between different segments along these macromolecules. The addition of nanoparticles can induce morphological transitions, resulting in complex co-assembly processes in which a rich variety of structures are formed.

large-NP-system
A large-scale simulation result of block copolymers mixed with nanoparticles (a) and an associated detailed view around a single nanoparticle (b)

We look forward to reading more about Javier’s work in the next IoP Computational Physics Group Newsletter. In the meantime, Javier’s thesis is available online.

 

Banner competition winner announced

The Computational Physics group is pleased to announce that Ilias Konstantinou, a PhD student at Newcastle University, has won our banner image competition with his image of a simulation of blood under a magnetic field. The submission, along with a brief scientific description and acknowledgements of funding can be found here:

I_Konstantinou_Banner-redacted

 

 

Final CPG banner competition extension

The deadline for the CPG Banner competition had been extended to January 31st 2019, midnight GMT as a reminder, terms and conditions can be found here, the hashtag associated with this competition is #CPGbannerCompetition. Please submit images which showcase computational physics to CPGbanner_comp@mail.com along with a 150 word caption understandable by non-experts. Prize values and other terms and conditions remain unchanged.

CPG banner competition extended

The deadline for the CPG Banner competition had been extended to January 1st 2019, as a reminder, terms and conditions can be found here, the hashtag has also been changed to the more accurate #CPGbannerCompetition. Please submit images which showcase computational physics to CPGbanner_comp@mail.com along with a 150 word caption understandable by non-experts. Prize values and other terms and conditions remain unchanged.

CPG banner competition

The computational physics group needs a new banner and we want your help to create it!

Please submit images which showcase computational physics to CPGbanner_comp@mail.com along with a 150 word caption understandable by non-experts. If you aren’t a CPG group member (but are an IoP member) then join — it’s free. Cash prizes will be offered (50 GBP for the first, 25 GBP for the two runner ups). See here for full terms and conditions. Submitters are also encouraged to tweet under #CPGbannerCompetition, but official submissions must be made through email. The competition closes on the 1st of January 2019

Questionnaire on the value of newer Fortran standards

Benefits of continuing Fortran standardisation

If you use Fortran, directly or indirectly, please will you complete this survey:

https://goo.gl/forms/JUFUReOoVUin2m8D2

It has been developed by the committee of the BCS Fortran Group to quantify the value of modern Fortran standards to organisations and individuals.  The results of the survey will help the Group justify continuing involvement in Fortran standardisation efforts.

The results of the survey will be shared with the ISO Fortran standardisation committee, so your responses will help shape the future of the Fortran language.

The survey will run until 31 Dec. 2018.

The Fortran language has been steadily developing since its origins in 1957.  Many people have been working on revising the Fortran specification, resulting in Fortran 77, 90, 95, 2003, 2008 and 2018 standards.  This survey is designed to find out exactly what benefits newer Fortran standards bring to the community.

We would like to know how newer Fortran standards have increased the quality of your code, cut development costs, increased portability or performance of your code, or whether you can attach any monetary value to the benefits enabled by modern Fortran standards.

This questionnaire contains 4 sections.  All questions are optional.  It will take no more than 10 minutes to complete.

Anton Shterenlikht, BCS Fortran Standards Officer